Spurning the Paris Climate Agreement Is the Right Call

Politico is reporting this morning that President Donald Trump will withdraw from the Paris Agreement. Mainstream political commentators have reacted with their customary fearmongering, but Trump’s repudiation of this deal should be welcomed news to anyone genuinely concerned with American political processes, American political independence, and the fortunes of the world’s poorest people.

The first test that the Paris Agreement failed was procedural. Upon its adoption in 2015, Barack Obama and then-Secretary of State John Kerry refrained from designating the international pact as a treaty and instead deemed it an executive agreement. This designation prevented the Paris Agreement from requiring Senate ratification. The executive agreement designation is not uncommon; in fact, its use has far surpassed that of the treaty since World War II. The designation is suitable for the many instances of diplomatic minutiae that need not concern the American public, but considering the Paris Agreement’s potential economic ramifications, Obama and Kerry should have sought the advice and consent of the Senate. Fearing a Senate rejection, however, they opted for the simpler option. As a result, Donald Trump now has the power to rescind our commitment with one stroke of a pen.

That is precisely what he should do.

The Paris Agreement not only fails on procedural grounds, it also fails on substance. Though the agreement does not specify the regulations any particular country must adopt, it nevertheless sacrifices America’s political independence and jeopardizes our energy future.

References to “climate justice” in the preamble and “climate finance” in Article 9 elucidate that temperature-rise attenuation is not the agreement’s lone impetus. Concepts such as “climate justice” and “climate finance” reveal a deeply retributive impulse that motivates the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change—the body responsible for the pact. In this intellectual framework, countries that have led the world’s ascent out of pre-industrial squalor are now held in contempt, as global economic gains have been accompanied by an escalation in our atmosphere’s carbon dioxide concentration. This agreement undermines American independence by implying a moral responsibility to directly finance the developing world’s game of catch-up. Furthermore, it suggests that the United States and its peers have reached a level of economic development that should leave them satisfied. This idea is anathema not only to the experiences of millions of American families already struggling to pay the bills without climate measures driving up energy prices, but also to our founding principles of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Americans have the right to pursue the energy options that best suit them regardless of any international convention.

Article 7 of the document contains another inversion. It advocates for the “urgent and immediate needs of those developing country Parties that are particularly vulnerable to the adverse effects of climate change.” Developing countries—and the world’s poorest people more generally—do indeed need advocates. They face the greatest threat from weather events as they lack the resources to prepare and recover. It is not a warming planet, however, that presents the greatest threat to their well-being: it is an absence of the energy-dependent infrastructure that keeps us comparatively safe in the developed world. Whether they live in southeast Asia or southeast Louisiana, the world’s poor do not need global climate agreements to improve their lives and their ability to withstand weather events—they need affordable energy.

Some Paris proponents, such as the executives from ExxonMobile[1], argue that by remaining a party to the deal we retain a proverbial seat-at-the-table to influence global decision-making. This approach, however, ignores that committing to the agreement offers an explicit endorsement of the problematic elements catalogued above and that as the world’s largest, most innovative economy the United States retains global influence regardless of this agreement. By resolutely standing opposed to the agreement, the United States will indicate that we prioritize the promise of global economic development, food security, and poverty eradication that come with economic freedom and energy development over the promise marginal temperature-rise attenuation. Furthermore, the agreement itself has a provision that would preserve our interest in influencing future developments while withholding our complete supports. Article 16 states: “Parties to the Convention [the UNFCCC, of which we are a member] that are not Parties to this Agreement may participate as observers in the proceedings of any session of the Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to this Agreement.” Additionally, if we stay in the agreement our 46th president, whoever that may be, could use the agreement’s calls for ever-intensifying national plans to justify something along the lines of Barack Obama’s “Clean Power Plan.”

Proponents of the Paris Agreement cower before the risks associated with rising global temperatures, but it is the economic and political risk of remaining a party to the agreement that should truly concern us—especially when we consider that market forces already reduced American greenhouse gas emissions by nearly 10 percent from 2005 to 2014 according to the EPA’s Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks.

President Trump has an opportunity to become a champion of energy development and economic progress for both the American people and the world’s poorest populations. Regardless of economic circumstances—and especially when facing adverse weather conditions—affordable, reliable energy is a guarantor of human flourishing. The Paris Agreement surrenders our political independence and stifles global energy development that benefits people across the planet. Rumors that Trump will reject this deal and rescind the commitment of the previous administration signal brighter days ahead.


[1] On Sunday, Financial Times reported that ExxonMobile chief executive Darren Woods recently penned a personal letter to President Trump urging him to keep the United States within the Paris Agreement. Though some observers have reacted with surprise, this is not a new position for the world’s largest publicly-traded oil and gas company. In fact, in a March 22 letter to the White House, another ExxonMobile executive, Peter Trelenberg, lobbied for continued American commitment to the agreement as well. Trelenberg’s letter—and presumably Woods’—portrays the agreement as a prudent, fair framework for addressing the risks associated with a warming planet.

The post Spurning the Paris Climate Agreement Is the Right Call appeared first on IER.

from Raymond Castleberry Blog http://raymondcastleberry.blogspot.com/2017/05/spurning-paris-climate-agreement-is.html
via http://raymondcastleberry.blogspot.com

Spurning the Paris Climate Agreement Is the Right Call

Politico is reporting this morning that President Donald Trump will withdraw from the Paris Agreement. Mainstream political commentators have reacted with their customary fearmongering, but Trump’s repudiation of this deal should be welcomed news to anyone genuinely concerned with American political processes, American political independence, and the fortunes of the world’s poorest people.

The first test that the Paris Agreement failed was procedural. Upon its adoption in 2015, Barack Obama and then-Secretary of State John Kerry refrained from designating the international pact as a treaty and instead deemed it an executive agreement. This designation prevented the Paris Agreement from requiring Senate ratification. The executive agreement designation is not uncommon; in fact, its use has far surpassed that of the treaty since World War II. The designation is suitable for the many instances of diplomatic minutiae that need not concern the American public, but considering the Paris Agreement’s potential economic ramifications, Obama and Kerry should have sought the advice and consent of the Senate. Fearing a Senate rejection, however, they opted for the simpler option. As a result, Donald Trump now has the power to rescind our commitment with one stroke of a pen.

That is precisely what he should do.

The Paris Agreement not only fails on procedural grounds, it also fails on substance. Though the agreement does not specify the regulations any particular country must adopt, it nevertheless sacrifices America’s political independence and jeopardizes our energy future.

References to “climate justice” in the preamble and “climate finance” in Article 9 elucidate that temperature-rise attenuation is not the agreement’s lone impetus. Concepts such as “climate justice” and “climate finance” reveal a deeply retributive impulse that motivates the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change—the body responsible for the pact. In this intellectual framework, countries that have led the world’s ascent out of pre-industrial squalor are now held in contempt, as global economic gains have been accompanied by an escalation in our atmosphere’s carbon dioxide concentration. This agreement undermines American independence by implying a moral responsibility to directly finance the developing world’s game of catch-up. Furthermore, it suggests that the United States and its peers have reached a level of economic development that should leave them satisfied. This idea is anathema not only to the experiences of millions of American families already struggling to pay the bills without climate measures driving up energy prices, but also to our founding principles of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Americans have the right to pursue the energy options that best suit them regardless of any international convention.

Article 7 of the document contains another inversion. It advocates for the “urgent and immediate needs of those developing country Parties that are particularly vulnerable to the adverse effects of climate change.” Developing countries—and the world’s poorest people more generally—do indeed need advocates. They face the greatest threat from weather events as they lack the resources to prepare and recover. It is not a warming planet, however, that presents the greatest threat to their well-being: it is an absence of the energy-dependent infrastructure that keeps us comparatively safe in the developed world. Whether they live in southeast Asia or southeast Louisiana, the world’s poor do not need global climate agreements to improve their lives and their ability to withstand weather events—they need affordable energy.

Some Paris proponents, such as the executives from ExxonMobile[1], argue that by remaining a party to the deal we retain a proverbial seat-at-the-table to influence global decision-making. This approach, however, ignores that committing to the agreement offers an explicit endorsement of the problematic elements catalogued above and that as the world’s largest, most innovative economy the United States retains global influence regardless of this agreement. By resolutely standing opposed to the agreement, the United States will indicate that we prioritize the promise of global economic development, food security, and poverty eradication that come with economic freedom and energy development over the promise marginal temperature-rise attenuation. Furthermore, the agreement itself has a provision that would preserve our interest in influencing future developments while withholding our complete supports. Article 16 states: “Parties to the Convention [the UNFCCC, of which we are a member] that are not Parties to this Agreement may participate as observers in the proceedings of any session of the Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to this Agreement.” Additionally, if we stay in the agreement our 46th president, whoever that may be, could use the agreement’s calls for ever-intensifying national plans to justify something along the lines of Barack Obama’s “Clean Power Plan.”

Proponents of the Paris Agreement cower before the risks associated with rising global temperatures, but it is the economic and political risk of remaining a party to the agreement that should truly concern us—especially when we consider that market forces already reduced American greenhouse gas emissions by nearly 10 percent from 2005 to 2014 according to the EPA’s Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks.

President Trump has an opportunity to become a champion of energy development and economic progress for both the American people and the world’s poorest populations. Regardless of economic circumstances—and especially when facing adverse weather conditions—affordable, reliable energy is a guarantor of human flourishing. The Paris Agreement surrenders our political independence and stifles global energy development that benefits people across the planet. Rumors that Trump will reject this deal and rescind the commitment of the previous administration signal brighter days ahead.


[1] On Sunday, Financial Times reported that ExxonMobile chief executive Darren Woods recently penned a personal letter to President Trump urging him to keep the United States within the Paris Agreement. Though some observers have reacted with surprise, this is not a new position for the world’s largest publicly-traded oil and gas company. In fact, in a March 22 letter to the White House, another ExxonMobile executive, Peter Trelenberg, lobbied for continued American commitment to the agreement as well. Trelenberg’s letter—and presumably Woods’—portrays the agreement as a prudent, fair framework for addressing the risks associated with a warming planet.

The post Spurning the Paris Climate Agreement Is the Right Call appeared first on IER.

Spurning the Paris Climate Agreement Is the Right Call

Politico is reporting this morning that President Donald Trump will withdraw from the Paris Agreement. Mainstream political commentators have reacted with their customary fearmongering, but Trump’s repudiation of this deal should be welcomed news to anyone genuinely concerned with American political processes, American political independence, and the fortunes of the world’s poorest people.

The first test that the Paris Agreement failed was procedural. Upon its adoption in 2015, Barack Obama and then-Secretary of State John Kerry refrained from designating the international pact as a treaty and instead deemed it an executive agreement. This designation prevented the Paris Agreement from requiring Senate ratification. The executive agreement designation is not uncommon; in fact, its use has far surpassed that of the treaty since World War II. The designation is suitable for the many instances of diplomatic minutiae that need not concern the American public, but considering the Paris Agreement’s potential economic ramifications, Obama and Kerry should have sought the advice and consent of the Senate. Fearing a Senate rejection, however, they opted for the simpler option. As a result, Donald Trump now has the power to rescind our commitment with one stroke of a pen.

That is precisely what he should do.

The Paris Agreement not only fails on procedural grounds, it also fails on substance. Though the agreement does not specify the regulations any particular country must adopt, it nevertheless sacrifices America’s political independence and jeopardizes our energy future.

References to “climate justice” in the preamble and “climate finance” in Article 9 elucidate that temperature-rise attenuation is not the agreement’s lone impetus. Concepts such as “climate justice” and “climate finance” reveal a deeply retributive impulse that motivates the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change—the body responsible for the pact. In this intellectual framework, countries that have led the world’s ascent out of pre-industrial squalor are now held in contempt, as global economic gains have been accompanied by an escalation in our atmosphere’s carbon dioxide concentration. This agreement undermines American independence by implying a moral responsibility to directly finance the developing world’s game of catch-up. Furthermore, it suggests that the United States and its peers have reached a level of economic development that should leave them satisfied. This idea is anathema not only to the experiences of millions of American families already struggling to pay the bills without climate measures driving up energy prices, but also to our founding principles of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Americans have the right to pursue the energy options that best suit them regardless of any international convention.

Article 7 of the document contains another inversion. It advocates for the “urgent and immediate needs of those developing country Parties that are particularly vulnerable to the adverse effects of climate change.” Developing countries—and the world’s poorest people more generally—do indeed need advocates. They face the greatest threat from weather events as they lack the resources to prepare and recover. It is not a warming planet, however, that presents the greatest threat to their well-being: it is an absence of the energy-dependent infrastructure that keeps us comparatively safe in the developed world. Whether they live in southeast Asia or southeast Louisiana, the world’s poor do not need global climate agreements to improve their lives and their ability to withstand weather events—they need affordable energy.

Some Paris proponents, such as the executives from ExxonMobile[1], argue that by remaining a party to the deal we retain a proverbial seat-at-the-table to influence global decision-making. This approach, however, ignores that committing to the agreement offers an explicit endorsement of the problematic elements catalogued above and that as the world’s largest, most innovative economy the United States retains global influence regardless of this agreement. By resolutely standing opposed to the agreement, the United States will indicate that we prioritize the promise of global economic development, food security, and poverty eradication that come with economic freedom and energy development over the promise marginal temperature-rise attenuation. Furthermore, the agreement itself has a provision that would preserve our interest in influencing future developments while withholding our complete supports. Article 16 states: “Parties to the Convention [the UNFCCC, of which we are a member] that are not Parties to this Agreement may participate as observers in the proceedings of any session of the Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to this Agreement.” Additionally, if we stay in the agreement our 46th president, whoever that may be, could use the agreement’s calls for ever-intensifying national plans to justify something along the lines of Barack Obama’s “Clean Power Plan.”

Proponents of the Paris Agreement cower before the risks associated with rising global temperatures, but it is the economic and political risk of remaining a party to the agreement that should truly concern us—especially when we consider that market forces already reduced American greenhouse gas emissions by nearly 10 percent from 2005 to 2014 according to the EPA’s Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks.

President Trump has an opportunity to become a champion of energy development and economic progress for both the American people and the world’s poorest populations. Regardless of economic circumstances—and especially when facing adverse weather conditions—affordable, reliable energy is a guarantor of human flourishing. The Paris Agreement surrenders our political independence and stifles global energy development that benefits people across the planet. Rumors that Trump will reject this deal and rescind the commitment of the previous administration signal brighter days ahead.


[1] On Sunday, Financial Times reported that ExxonMobile chief executive Darren Woods recently penned a personal letter to President Trump urging him to keep the United States within the Paris Agreement. Though some observers have reacted with surprise, this is not a new position for the world’s largest publicly-traded oil and gas company. In fact, in a March 22 letter to the White House, another ExxonMobile executive, Peter Trelenberg, lobbied for continued American commitment to the agreement as well. Trelenberg’s letter—and presumably Woods’—portrays the agreement as a prudent, fair framework for addressing the risks associated with a warming planet.

The post Spurning the Paris Climate Agreement Is the Right Call appeared first on IER.

Optimizing AngularJS Single-Page Applications for Googlebot Crawlers

Posted by jrridley

It’s almost certain that you’ve encountered AngularJS on the web somewhere, even if you weren’t aware of it at the time. Here’s a list of just a few sites using Angular:

  • Upwork.com
  • Freelancer.com
  • Udemy.com
  • Youtube.com

Any of those look familiar? If so, it’s because AngularJS is taking over the Internet. There’s a good reason for that: Angular- and other React-style frameworks make for a better user and developer experience on a site. For background, AngularJS and ReactJS are part of a web design movement called single-page applications, or SPAs. While a traditional website loads each individual page as the user navigates the site, including calls to the server and cache, loading resources, and rendering the page, SPAs cut out much of the back-end activity by loading the entire site when a user first lands on a page. Instead of loading a new page each time you click on a link, the site dynamically updates a single HTML page as the user interacts with the site.

image001.png

Image c/o Microsoft

Why is this movement taking over the Internet? With SPAs, users are treated to a screaming fast site through which they can navigate almost instantaneously, while developers have a template that allows them to customize, test, and optimize pages seamlessly and efficiently. AngularJS and ReactJS use advanced Javascript templates to render the site, which means the HTML/CSS page speed overhead is almost nothing. All site activity runs behind the scenes, out of view of the user.

Unfortunately, anyone who’s tried performing SEO on an Angular or React site knows that the site activity is hidden from more than just site visitors: it’s also hidden from web crawlers. Crawlers like Googlebot rely heavily on HTML/CSS data to render and interpret the content on a site. When that HTML content is hidden behind website scripts, crawlers have no website content to index and serve in search results.

Of course, Google claims they can crawl Javascript (and SEOs have tested and supported this claim), but even if that is true, Googlebot still struggles to crawl sites built on a SPA framework. One of the first issues we encountered when a client first approached us with an Angular site was that nothing beyond the homepage was appearing in the SERPs. ScreamingFrog crawls uncovered the homepage and a handful of other Javascript resources, and that was it.

SF Javascript.png

Another common issue is recording Google Analytics data. Think about it: Analytics data is tracked by recording pageviews every time a user navigates to a page. How can you track site analytics when there’s no HTML response to trigger a pageview?

After working with several clients on their SPA websites, we’ve developed a process for performing SEO on those sites. By using this process, we’ve not only enabled SPA sites to be indexed by search engines, but even to rank on the first page for keywords.

5-step solution to SEO for AngularJS

  1. Make a list of all pages on the site
  2. Install Prerender
  3. “Fetch as Google”
  4. Configure Analytics
  5. Recrawl the site

1) Make a list of all pages on your site

If this sounds like a long and tedious process, that’s because it definitely can be. For some sites, this will be as easy as exporting the XML sitemap for the site. For other sites, especially those with hundreds or thousands of pages, creating a comprehensive list of all the pages on the site can take hours or days. However, I cannot emphasize enough how helpful this step has been for us. Having an index of all pages on the site gives you a guide to reference and consult as you work on getting your site indexed. It’s almost impossible to predict every issue that you’re going to encounter with an SPA, and if you don’t have an all-inclusive list of content to reference throughout your SEO optimization, it’s highly likely you’ll leave some part of the site un-indexed by search engines inadvertently.

One solution that might enable you to streamline this process is to divide content into directories instead of individual pages. For example, if you know that you have a list of storeroom pages, include your /storeroom/ directory and make a note of how many pages that includes. Or if you have an e-commerce site, make a note of how many products you have in each shopping category and compile your list that way (though if you have an e-commerce site, I hope for your own sake you have a master list of products somewhere). Regardless of what you do to make this step less time-consuming, make sure you have a full list before continuing to step 2.

2) Install Prerender

Prerender is going to be your best friend when performing SEO for SPAs. Prerender is a service that will render your website in a virtual browser, then serve the static HTML content to web crawlers. From an SEO standpoint, this is as good of a solution as you can hope for: users still get the fast, dynamic SPA experience while search engine crawlers can identify indexable content for search results.

Prerender’s pricing varies based on the size of your site and the freshness of the cache served to Google. Smaller sites (up to 250 pages) can use Prerender for free, while larger sites (or sites that update constantly) may need to pay as much as $200+/month. However, having an indexable version of your site that enables you to attract customers through organic search is invaluable. This is where that list you compiled in step 1 comes into play: if you can prioritize what sections of your site need to be served to search engines, or with what frequency, you may be able to save a little bit of money each month while still achieving SEO progress.

3) “Fetch as Google”

Within Google Search Console is an incredibly useful feature called “Fetch as Google.” “Fetch as Google” allows you to enter a URL from your site and fetch it as Googlebot would during a crawl. “Fetch” returns the HTTP response from the page, which includes a full download of the page source code as Googlebot sees it. “Fetch and Render” will return the HTTP response and will also provide a screenshot of the page as Googlebot saw it and as a site visitor would see it.

This has powerful applications for AngularJS sites. Even with Prerender installed, you may find that Google is still only partially displaying your website, or it may be omitting key features of your site that are helpful to users. Plugging the URL into “Fetch as Google” will let you review how your site appears to search engines and what further steps you may need to take to optimize your keyword rankings. Additionally, after requesting a “Fetch” or “Fetch and Render,” you have the option to “Request Indexing” for that page, which can be handy catalyst for getting your site to appear in search results.

4) Configure Google Analytics (or Google Tag Manager)

As I mentioned above, SPAs can have serious trouble with recording Google Analytics data since they don’t track pageviews the way a standard website does. Instead of the traditional Google Analytics tracking code, you’ll need to install Analytics through some kind of alternative method.

One method that works well is to use the Angulartics plugin. Angulartics replaces standard pageview events with virtual pageview tracking, which tracks the entire user navigation across your application. Since SPAs dynamically load HTML content, these virtual pageviews are recorded based on user interactions with the site, which ultimately tracks the same user behavior as you would through traditional Analytics. Other people have found success using Google Tag Manager “History Change” triggers or other innovative methods, which are perfectly acceptable implementations. As long as your Google Analytics tracking records user interactions instead of conventional pageviews, your Analytics configuration should suffice.

5) Recrawl the site

After working through steps 1–4, you’re going to want to crawl the site yourself to find those errors that not even Googlebot was anticipating. One issue we discovered early with a client was that after installing Prerender, our crawlers were still running into a spider trap:

As you can probably tell, there were not actually 150,000 pages on that particular site. Our crawlers just found a recursive loop that kept generating longer and longer URL strings for the site content. This is something we would not have found in Google Search Console or Analytics. SPAs are notorious for causing tedious, inexplicable issues that you’ll only uncover by crawling the site yourself. Even if you follow the steps above and take as many precautions as possible, I can still almost guarantee you will come across a unique issue that can only be diagnosed through a crawl.

If you’ve come across any of these unique issues, let me know in the comments! I’d love to hear what other issues people have encountered with SPAs.

Results

As I mentioned earlier in the article, the process outlined above has enabled us to not only get client sites indexed, but even to get those sites ranking on first page for various keywords. Here’s an example of the keyword progress we made for one client with an AngularJS site:

Also, the organic traffic growth for that client over the course of seven months:

All of this goes to show that although SEO for SPAs can be tedious, laborious, and troublesome, it is not impossible. Follow the steps above, and you can have SEO success with your single-page app website.

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!

from Raymond Castleberry Blog http://raymondcastleberry.blogspot.com/2017/05/optimizing-angularjs-single-page.html
via http://raymondcastleberry.blogspot.com

Solar Energy International (SEI) Announces New Board Officers

Solar Energy International (SEI) Announces New Board Officers

Solar Energy International is pleased to announce Paul Bony as the new Board President. Paul has a diversified background in marketing and delivering energy efficiency and renewable energy products and services at the utility, manufacturer, distributor, dealer and consumer level and presently works for The Electric Gas Industry Association as their Director of Renewables and Contractor Development.  “I am excited to be following in the footsteps of others who have helped steer this great organization and its incredible staff and instructors to its position of leadership in solar training.  SEI has accomplished great things since its humble beginnings 26 years ago.  With the help of our team, our alumni and our friends we are on course to achieve even more as we play our part to move to a world powered by renewable energy.”  

Ken Gardner was elected as Vice President of the Board. Ken is a long-time PV, microhydro and solar water pumping instructor and is the Founder and CEO of Gardner Energy Services in Utah.  “I have thoroughly enjoyed teaching with SEI for the past eight years. Our goal is to make sure consumers and businesses get the quality they need when installing renewable energy systems. Being on the board allows me to make sure that happens and to make sure that people are treated fairly and learn what is needed to properly serve our customers.”

SEI is deeply grateful to Ed Marston for his seven years of service, including five years as President. With Ed’s leadership, SEI emerged even stronger than ever from a difficult financial situation by consolidating our operations, restructuring the organization, implementing a strategic plan that focused on SEI’s strengths, and expanding its campus in Paonia, Colorado, as well as expanding into Latin America and the Middle East. “I am truly grateful to have had Ed as our Board President, a mentor, a critic, a visionary, a doer during these past five years. Ed has done a remarkable job of helping SEI think bigger so that we truly can have a world powered by renewable energy,” stated Executive Director Kathy Swartz

Many of SEI’s Paonia students had the opportunity to hear Ed during morning introductions on their first day of class. Each week Ed gave a different opening by weaving together Paonia’s local coal-mining, agricultural and marijuana economies,to Thomas Edison, Topsy the elephant and Tesla, to each person’s role in the energy revolution. These often ended in a round of applause (and once a standing ovation).

“I watched Ed build a Board of Directors that will most capably guide SEI along the exciting path that lies ahead.  He sees much further into the future than most of us.  We will miss his vision,” stated Board Secretary/Treasurer Sarah G. Bishop.

Though Ed left SEI and the other boards he served on, it’s all part of his plan. You may see him out doing wind sprints on the trails around Paonia, influencing local politics in the ways that only Ed can, or working to bring more businesses to town.

 

The post Solar Energy International (SEI) Announces New Board Officers appeared first on Solar Training – Solar Installer Training – Solar PV Installation Training – Solar Energy Courses – Renewable Energy Education – NABCEP – Solar Energy International (SEI).

from Raymond Castleberry Blog http://raymondcastleberry.blogspot.com/2017/05/solar-energy-international-sei.html
via http://raymondcastleberry.blogspot.com

To Utility and Beyond

Susannah Pedigo came to Solar Energy International (SEI) with more than 20 years of management experience in the renewable energy sector. Her resume reads a lot like a recent history of the solar industry as she’s navigated the changes of the emerging market. Each role she took was newly designed to keep up with the changing demands of a growing industry. The unifying role of each job was a strong ability to facilitate communication between the broad set of solar stakeholders; governments and research centers, utilities and residential customers, technical staff and corporate developers. Throughout her career, she’s demonstrated a remarkable skill to bring the requisite technical knowledge of the solar industry, combined with business management experience to meet the needs of the ultimate end user.

Currently the Director of Origination and Business Development at Lendlease, Susannah manages business development and partnership efforts with utilities and other solar stakeholders with the goal of growing the utility-scale and wholesale-distributed generation pipeline in the US. Her job builds upon all the knowledge she’s built partnering with utilities, public organizations  and private business while continually navigating about the technical advancements and legislative terrain of the solar industry. In pursuit of that technical training and for the joy that comes from working on the systems that she deals with daily, Susannah came to SEI for a hands-on solar training course.

Susannah attended SEI’s PV201L: Solar Electric Lab Week (Grid-Direct). During this week-long, hands-on solar training students rotate through multiple PV systems where they fully install and commission systems consisting of modules, inverters, and racking components from a wide range of manufacturers. Of her SEI experience she said. “the curriculum is a good balance of theory and practical applications which I’d highly recommend.”  During her week at SEI, Susannah was able to share her experience with her fellow students all at different points in their careers. Speaking of her time working with Xcel Energy, gave recommendations for interfacing with utilities to the future solar installers in the class.

She reiterated the imperative of solar training for anyone in the industry, saying, “though you may be be working in sales or business development, you will work with technical people everyday. The industry is highly competitive and you’re constantly looking for ways to add value and be cost effective. I need technical knowledge to interact with our technical staff to get the best value and cost effective solution for our clients. This is true for a rooftop system or utility scale solar plant.”

While Susannah’s spent a large part of her career in solar, she didn’t begin there.She began with a degree in Landscape Architecture and a passion for sustainability. She spent ten years working in City Planning on the Front Rage of Colorado before entering the solar industry. Susannah’s first position in solar was at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) as the Senior Communication Manager where she built relationships with the Department of Energy to significantly grow NREL’s Solar Research Program. During this time, she also earned an MBA from the University of Denver.

This experience led her to Xcel Energy, the fifth largest investor-owned utility in the United States. While at Xcel Energy, she oversaw the management of the company’s customer-facing renewable energy products such as Solar*Rewards (250+ MW rooftop solar). She was also a key participant in the legislative, rulemaking and subsequent program development efforts for community solar initiatives in Colorado and Minnesota. Her career illustrates what is possible in the rapidly growing solar industry, whether you bring business acumen, legislative knowledge or technical ability. The industry is broad and, with proper training, there’s a place for everyone.

The post To Utility and Beyond appeared first on Solar Training – Solar Installer Training – Solar PV Installation Training – Solar Energy Courses – Renewable Energy Education – NABCEP – Solar Energy International (SEI).

from Raymond Castleberry Blog http://raymondcastleberry.blogspot.com/2017/05/to-utility-and-beyond.html
via http://raymondcastleberry.blogspot.com

Solar Energy International (SEI) Announces New Board Officers

Solar Energy International (SEI) Announces New Board Officers

Solar Energy International is pleased to announce Paul Bony as the new Board President. Paul has a diversified background in marketing and delivering energy efficiency and renewable energy products and services at the utility, manufacturer, distributor, dealer and consumer level and presently works for The Electric Gas Industry Association as their Director of Renewables and Contractor Development.  “I am excited to be following in the footsteps of others who have helped steer this great organization and its incredible staff and instructors to its position of leadership in solar training.  SEI has accomplished great things since its humble beginnings 26 years ago.  With the help of our team, our alumni and our friends we are on course to achieve even more as we play our part to move to a world powered by renewable energy.”  

Ken Gardner was elected as Vice President of the Board. Ken is a long-time PV, microhydro and solar water pumping instructor and is the Founder and CEO of Gardner Energy Services in Utah.  “I have thoroughly enjoyed teaching with SEI for the past eight years. Our goal is to make sure consumers and businesses get the quality they need when installing renewable energy systems. Being on the board allows me to make sure that happens and to make sure that people are treated fairly and learn what is needed to properly serve our customers.”

SEI is deeply grateful to Ed Marston for his seven years of service, including five years as President. With Ed’s leadership, SEI emerged even stronger than ever from a difficult financial situation by consolidating our operations, restructuring the organization, implementing a strategic plan that focused on SEI’s strengths, and expanding its campus in Paonia, Colorado, as well as expanding into Latin America and the Middle East. “I am truly grateful to have had Ed as our Board President, a mentor, a critic, a visionary, a doer during these past five years. Ed has done a remarkable job of helping SEI think bigger so that we truly can have a world powered by renewable energy,” stated Executive Director Kathy Swartz

Many of SEI’s Paonia students had the opportunity to hear Ed during morning introductions on their first day of class. Each week Ed gave a different opening by weaving together Paonia’s local coal-mining, agricultural and marijuana economies,to Thomas Edison, Topsy the elephant and Tesla, to each person’s role in the energy revolution. These often ended in a round of applause (and once a standing ovation).

“I watched Ed build a Board of Directors that will most capably guide SEI along the exciting path that lies ahead.  He sees much further into the future than most of us.  We will miss his vision,” stated Board Secretary/Treasurer Sarah G. Bishop.

Though Ed left SEI and the other boards he served on, it’s all part of his plan. You may see him out doing wind sprints on the trails around Paonia, influencing local politics in the ways that only Ed can, or working to bring more businesses to town.

 

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